Sue Waters Blog

October 13, 2013
by Sue Waters
6 Comments

Digital Curation: Putting the Pieces Together

Through digital curation we collect, manage and collate the best, most relevant content, on a specific topic or theme,  for ourselves and share with others.

Using tools like Scoop.it, Pinterest, Diigo and Livebinders educators collect the best resources to put them into context with organisation, annotation and presentation.

This post is a summary of the ideas. tips and resources shared during my presentation for the 2013 Reform Symposium e-Conference on digital curation.

Digital curation in education

It’s no longer just about creating content.  We are living in an era of content abundance.

It’s now about finding and putting content into a context, in a meaningful and organised way, around specific topics.

Using tools like Scoop.it, Pinterest, Diigo and Livebinders educators collect the best resources to put them into context with organisation, annotation and presentation.

The digital curation process

Types of tools needed

There are two types of tools needed for curation (watch Harold Rheingold’s interview with Robin Good on Curation):

Tools needed to curate

News discovery tools select and aggregate the content while the curation tools are used to display your content with context with organisation, annotation and presentation.  News discovery tools are all about saving time by feeding you the most relevant content.

CurationTools

Popular curation toolsThere are a gazilion tools you can use.; and which tools you use, and how you curate, is a personal as the tools you use to build your personal learning network (PLN).

Digital curation is a simple as:

  1. Find the tool(s) that you prefer to use for news discovery and for curation.
  2. Curate the content that helps you, and is helpful for others.
  3. Make it part of your routine to curate and share content.

You can check out examples of the different tools used by educators to curate in our Digital Curation – use in education storify or share information on how you curate by participating in our Digital curation survey.

Check out Curation: The Next Big C by John Pearce.

My Curation tools

My main curation tools are: my blogs ( The EdubloggerEdubogs Teacher ChallengesSue Waters);  FlipboardPinterestStorify; and Twitter.

Flipboard

Flipboard was originally designed as a social network aggregation, magazine-format app for iPad in 2010.  It is now the most popular of the magazine-like content aggrregator apps for iOS, Android, Kindle and Nook.

Flipboard’s strength is you are able to bring your social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn into one location alongside your favorite news sources and anything else you like to read, or watch (like YouTube) – all while making it easily to share your favorite content with your social networks and enabling you to easily curate your favorite content into Flipboard magazine(s)

Flipboard  is one of my key news discovery and curation tools because:

  1. It allows me to easily aggregrate content from a range of different sources.
  2. Quickly curate and share articles I like directly to my own magazine from within Flipboard (or using the Flip It bookmarklet in your web browser) while also sharing the articles with  with social networks at the same time!

Here’s a quick video on how I use Flipboard magazines to find, curate and share content.

You’ll find a complete step by step guide to setting up Flipboard here.

Pinterest

Pinterest is a pinboard-style visual booknarking website that allows users to create and manage visual content.   You can share images or videos you find online, or you can upload images directly to Pinterest.

Here’s some examples of our Pinterest boards:

Here’s a quick video on how to use Pinterest.

Storify

Storify allows you to curate your own stories from photos, video, tweets, what people post on social media sites and your own narration.

I use Storify as a way of pulling information shared on a topic in Twitter into one locate where I can refer back to it later.  For example.  I asked my Twitter network to share ”Do you curate? What tools do you use? Why you curate? Why you don’t curate? Are you confused by what is digital curation?”  and then pulled their answers into this Digital Curation – use in education storify.

Here’s a quick video on how to use Storify.

What are your tips?

How do you curate?  What advice would you give others on curating content?  Is there anything I’ve included that you want covered in more detail?

Please tell us more about how you curate by participating in our Digital curation survey

February 11, 2013
by Sue Waters
15 Comments

Getting More Out of Student Blogging

Through ETMOOC participants like Lorraine Boulos are realizing ”I am not just learning HOW to connect but WHY connect” and are now trying to transfer the skills they’re learning into their classrooms.

So I’ve put together tips for getting the most out of blogging with your student (you can watch the recorded ETMOOC student blogging session here).

For more information I recommend you work through our step by step guide to blogging with students.

About my work

But first to help you appreciate why I was asked to facilitate blogging session — I’ve been supporting educational blogs on Edublogs.org, Edublogs Campus and WPMU DEV since 2008.

We host over 2 million Edublogs worldwide in all educational sectors (K!2, Colleges, Universities, Vocational Education and Training, and more).

Pretty much 365 days a year I provide blogging assistance and get to see how blogs are used by different sectors globally.

The following ClustrMaps is from The Edublogger to provide you with an indication of the spread of educational blogging.

About Edublogs

How blogs are used

There is no one way to use a blog; educators use blogs for a wide range of purposes (as shown in the graphic below).

You can read a more detailed explanation of how educators use blogs here.

How blogs are used

 

The different blogging approaches used

While there is a wide range of reasons why educators use blogs; there are four main blogging approaches taken when educators use blogs with students.

These are:

  1. Class blog only – the educator publishes all the posts on the class blog and the students may respond by leaving comments.
  2. Class blog only – the educator and students both publish posts on the class blog.
  3. Student blogs only – each student has their own individual blog and there is no class blog.
  4. Class blog and student blogs – the educator publishes all the posts on the class blog and each student has their own individual blog.

Scaffold vs Struggle

The question is ‘scaffold vs struggle’.  Can you be too helpful when introducing blogging to students?

Jan Smith‘s advice is:

 The big idea is to go slow to go fast.

If you don’t lay the groundwork by building a community of trust, risk, support with your kids they fail big.

Reading and commenting have to be the core, or else a blog is just a digital bulletin board.

Being an expert at Grand Theft Auto on the X-box doesn’t mean you can jump in a car and drive it without being taught how to drive a car.  We teach our kids to drive because we know they need lessons to scaffold them from needing driving instructions to becoming independent drivers.

By doing so we’re hoping this is less likely to happen:

Photo by UnkowIT licensed under Creative Commons ShareAlike.

It’s the same with our students when it comes to using technology in an educational context.  They might have grown up with technology but this doesn’t mean they’ll know how to use it in an educational learning context.

Almost all educators who blog well with their students use scaffolding – regardless of the age of the students.  It’s like teaching someone to drive a car.  They break down the process into key steps from learning to blog to becoming independent connected learners.

Here’s an example:

  • Bianca learnt to blog in Grade 2 in 2010 (in Kathleen Morris’s class) where she progressed from learning how to write quality comments, to writing posts on the class blog to having her own student blog.
  • Bianca has been in non blogging classrooms for the past 2 years and has continued to blog independently on her own student blog.

Below are the key scaffolding steps when using blogs for connected learning:

Scaffolding your student blogging

 

Digital footprint and your role

Digital Foot Prints

Photo by jjay69 licensed under Creative Commons ShareAlike

But before talking more about blogging we need to discuss digital footprint and your role in  your student’s digital footprint.

Digital footprint is becoming an issue for us as students become more aware of their own digital footprint and how to check it.  We’re being contacted by former students, or their parents, regarding posts, comments or photos made of blogs back as far as 2008.

Google cache’s all websites so Google doesn’t need to constantly index webpages.  We can remove comments, posts, images from a blog on our servers and it can take a looooong time for it to disappear from Google Search results.

You can read more about how Google Cache works here.

Google Cache

This is why it is really important to educate students on digital footprint and leave it for them to create their digital footprint when they are older (or if they are University students let them decide if they want the blog to be part of their digital footprint).

Our recommendations are:

  • Never use full names for students.
  • Use only their first name or a pseudo name  and apply this rule to their username, blog URLs, any photos (including file names), documents, comments.
  • Educate their family e.g. encourage family to leave comments such as Matt’s mum or Samantha’s nana.

Developing quality commenting skills

As Kathleen Morris says:

If commenting skills are not taught and constantly reinforced, students will limit their comments to things like “I like your blog!” or “2KM is cool!”. While enthusiasm is high with these sorts of comments, students are not developing their literacy skills or having meaningful interactions with other members of the blogging community. Conversations in the comment section of a blog are such rich and meaningful learning experiences for students. Conversations begin with high quality comments.

Blogging is an authentic avenue for developing student literacy skills.   When you invest the time in teaching, modelling, revising and promoting high quality writing of comments, students can make great gains in their overall literacy development.

Check out improvements in student literacy skills through commenting here.

Set your standards high from the start and reap the rewards!

Tips from participants in the student blogging webinar for developing quality commenting skills included:

  • Provide fast, good, meaningful feedback that models the type of commenting you are targeting.
  • Show Linda Yollis’s ‘How to compose quality comments‘ video.
  • Start with a paper blogging lesson which includes commenting using Post-it notes.  We stress that you comment to keep conversations going (check out Learning to blog using paper).
  • Use an offline snowball activity.  Teacher provides a writing prompt and students write a post.  The paper is crumpled and tossed around the room until about 3 students have responded to their writing.  It is then returned to the original writer and the class debriefs the process.
  • Tour of blog comments may be helpful to showcase how it is done (here are some blogs to check).

Creating Global Connections

Connecting with other classes can have a huge impact on your class blog because:

  1. Your students benefit from having an authentic and global audience
  2. You gain from being supported by other educators — increasing your skills and developing new ideas that benefit your students

An authentic and global audience is important because:

  • When students are writing or publishing for an audience other the teacher, it impacts how they view what they doing and the intrinsic motivation they have.
  • Students love seeing their work on the Internet and adore getting comments from people. It motivates them to write as it gives them an audience that is real.  The blog opens up a whole new world of people who can offer encouragement and feedback.
  •  Blogging provides an authentic educational experience, where what they write is not only seen and commented on by their teacher, but by their peers and the “public.” For most students, it’s a bit of extra motivation knowing their peers will see their work.
  • There is an authentic audience – a global audience – one that is willing to connect, share, challenge, discuss and communicate with classes. This audience can provide further information, opinions, suggest resources, seek answers to questions and so on which pushes blogging further.
  • Provides real world problems and solutions to share.

Summarized from The State of Educational blogging in 2012.

Tips from participants in the student blogging webinar for global connections included:

  • It’s important to have a shared vision of what is blogging and what it can be when engaging in projects with other classes.  Worth taking the time to research the other class (aka spy on them) to see if you have similar shared visions).
  • Joining a community like the Student Blogging Challenge, QuadBlogging and Global Classroom Project helps.
  • Join relevant eLists, connect, liaise and then propose collaboration.

Read more about connecting with other classes here.

Getting Family Involved

Class blogs are an excellent way for parents to find out what is happening in class and what their child is learning.

As Kathleen Morris says:

You can’t leave parent participation to chance. Parents needs to be educated and regularly encouraged and invited to be part of your class blog.”  If you want to get the most out of your class blog you need to help parent and students connect with and easily find your class blog.

But there’s nothing more frustrating trying to find your teacher’s website and not being able to find it — make it too hard and they’ll quickly give up.

It’s quite common for educators new to blogging to assume their class blog is easily found using Google or that students will write the blog URL correctly in their notebook.  These aren’t good approaches and decrease the chances they will be able to find your class blog.

Experienced educators use several different methods to help parents and students:

  1. Understand what is a blog and how they can participate.
  2. Easily find the class blog.

Tips from participants in the student blogging webinar for getting family involved included:

  • Having a family blogging month.
  • Have grandparents write posts (here is an example).
  • Have students teach parents how to comment on posts.
  • Add your blog URL to your email signature, communicate with parents often and choose an obscure name for the blog.
  • Link to the class blog from the school website.

Monitoring Student Blogs

The final key ingredient in student blogging is to make sure you monitor your student blogs.

It’s important to know what is happening on your student blogs and be able to act quickly if necessarily.   Some educators do this by moderating all comments and/or posts so that only those they approve are published while others don’t and monitor student work using Google Reader.

Here’s what we recommend:

  1. Add yourself as an admin user to all student blogs so you can easily log into their dashboard to make changes if necessary.
  2. Monitor student work using Google Reader or some other option so you know what they are doing (you can do this using Users > Reports on Edublogs.org blogs)
  3. Add a link to all student blogs from your sidebar – set up a blog roll or use Class Blog widget if you’ve set up My Class.

If you are using My Class on an Edublogs.org blog this is done automatically for you when you set up My Class.

You can learn more about My Class here or watch the following videos.

For more information I recommend you work through our step by step guide to blogging with students.

January 28, 2013
by Sue Waters
2 Comments

Staying Sane: Letting Go To Learn More!

A common challenge with connected learning is you want to learn it all NOW!

But some times it is better to remember:

Tortoise

Adapted from Photo by pareeerica via Creative Commons ShareAlike 2.0

I’m keen to see ETMOOC participants celebrating their learning and achievements in March like this:

Jumping Over The 3rd Largest Pyramid In The World

Adapted from photo by Anirudh Koul via Creative Commons ShareAlike

Rather give up feeling overwhelmed like this:

Remember you don’t need to follow every link, think about every conversation.

Thinks about what you want to learn and focus your time on this.  Sometimes quality is better than quantity.

Prioritizing your Learning

Below is a visualization of my work flow to show how I manage and prioritize my learning.

Hopefully it helps you?

Sketching my workflow helps me:

  1. Reflect on what I’m doing and areas I want to improve or make more time effective.
  2. Share with others so they can provide their input in other aspects I might consider.

PS:

  • I normally do this as a quick sketch, share it on Twitter and ask my followers for their input by asking them questions about it.
  • I’ve made it prettier using SnagIT so it is easier to see how I prioritize and manage my workload.

You’ll find my tips for working smarter in a learning community here.

My workflow

Thanks for Debs Seed and Sally Wilson for sharing their visualizations that reminded me that this is part of my practice; and Serge for spotlighting the benefits of creating a workflow.

And remember!

ETMOOC is all about your learning and what you want to learn!

 

January 22, 2013
by Sue Waters
33 Comments

Work smarter and stay connected in a learning community

A key skill working online is working out strategies that save you time.

It’s all about:

  • Working smarter not harder.
  • Saving time while maximizing outcome.
  • Learning to focus on what you want to learn - you don’t need to follow every link, think about every conversation.  Learn to let go!

And when you’re participating in a connectivist MOOC like ETMOOC where over 1,500 participants are interacting through their blogs,  Google+ community, through the ETMOOC Twitter hashtag and a wide range of tools working out strategies to work smarter are essential.

Off course developing strategies to work smarter is often easier said than done especially if you are new to this type of learning environment.

That’s where someone like me comes in.  As an experienced user I’m constantly fine tuning my strategies to work smarter.

Here are my strategies for working smarter as part of ETMOOC that will help you!

Take ideas from what I do and then find what works best for you!  

I’ve included tips for those who have an android tablet or iPad as they both are time savers since the apps make reading and interacting faster than using a computer.

Interacting in BlackBoard Collaborate

1.  Saving the Chat and Whiteboard

Trying to focus on the chat, what’s being said and the Whiteboard can be overwhelming.

Don’t stress or worry too much about keeping up.

You can easily save the Chat log and Whiteboard just before you leave the session; and then reflect on the conversations in your own time.

This is as simple as:

1.  Go to File > Save > Chat and save the chat log.

Save chat

2.  Go to File > Save > Whiteboard and save the whiteboard as a PDF.

Save Whiteboard

2.  Trouble shooting Collaborate issues

Some participants have had issues logging into the Collaborate sessions.

The best option is to visit the Blackboard Collaborate’s System Requirements page to ensure your systems meets their requirements and to test it using their configuration room.

All recorded sessions are archived here.

Interacting in the Google+ Community

1.  Turn off Email notifications

First tip that most are aware of is turn off the email notifications :)

The Google+ ETMOOC community has been so active that email overload has been an issue.

Google Plus notifications

Then all I do is twice daily check the Google+ ETMOOC communiity  and quickly review that latest updates.

You can learn more about using Google+ here.

2.  Use the Google+ app 

Next tip is it is faster to interact in the Google+ community using the Google+ app on an Android Tablet or iPad.  Also works quite well on an iPhone.

All I do is twice daily load the Google+ app on my Android tablet and quickly review that latest updates.

Below’s what it looks like reading on my Tablet:

Google Plus on an android tablet

Interacting with blog posts

1.  Subscribe to the ETMOOC blog hub post feed

The fastest way to read and interact with participants’ blogs is to add them to Google Reader using ETMOOC blog hub feed as follows:

1.  Logging into your Google Reader account

Here’s how to set up Google Reader if you’ve never used before.

2.  Click on Subscribe.

3.  Add this URL http://etmooc.org/hub/

For those using other types of RSS readers you will find the RSS feed at http://etmooc.org/hub/feed/

4.  Click Add.

Google Reader

Benefits of using the ETMOOC blog hub RSS are:

  1. It’s faster to quickly read recently updated posts.
  2. The full post is pulled into Google Reader, unless the blogger has used the Read More tag, so you can easily read the entire post inside Google Reader whereas only the post excerpt is display on the ETMOOC blog hub page.
2.  Read posts from Google Reader on a tablet

It’s faster to read posts in Google Reader on a tablet:

  1. Google Reader app - android tablet
  2. Reeder - iPad

Alternatively you can use a magazine style app like FlipBoard (use http://etmooc.org/hub/feed/ to subscribe using Flipboard).   Magazine style apps are personal preference.  I prefer to easily read the full post using the Google Reader app whereas magazine apps show the post excerpt in a magazine style layout.

Below is what a post looks like in the Google Reader app.

Reading in Google Reader app

Below is what the feed looks like in the FlipBoard app.

Reading in FlipBoard

 

3.  Subscribe to email notification of new comments

When you leave a comment on another participants post select the subscribe to email notification of new comments if they have this option.

This notifies you of any further comments on that post and makes it easier for you to continue the conversation in the comments — if you choose.

Subscribing to comments

If you’re using an Edublogs.org blog you need to:

  1. Go to Plugins
  2. Activate Subscribe to Comments plugin

Interacting with the #etmooc Hashtag on Twitter

1.  Set up a Twitter client and monitor the #etmooc hashtag 

A twitter client is a MUST as they provide instant notification of the latest updates and easy response to the tweets.  Which Twitter client you use is personal.

If you are new to Twitter start by first checking out this Twitter Guide.

Here is what I use:

  1. TweetDeck – on my computer.
  2. FlipBoard – my tablets

2.  Monitoring hashtags using TweetDeck

Here’s where you’ll find information on setting up TweetDeck.

Monitoring hashtags using TweetDeck is as simple as:

1.  Add your hashtag term to the search box in TweetDeck and press Enter.

2.  When the search window loads click on Add Column.

3.  Your search column will load in TweetDeck and all tweets using that hashtag will be updated as they’re tweeted.

2.  Monitoring hashtags using FlipBoard

There’s a range of different apps you could use to monitor the ETMOOC hashtag on Twitter however personally I think FlipBoard is one of the better options as it pulls in the post excerpt, videos and images if someone shares links in their tweet.

Below is what the #ETMOOC hashtag looks like in FlipBoard:

Hashtag in FlipBoard

Here’s where you’ll find information on setting up FlipBoard.

Monitoring hashtags using FlipBoard is as simple as:

1.  Tap on Search

Tap on search

2.  Add your hashtag ( #etmooc) to the search field and tap on search.

Add your hashtag

3.  Tap on the + sign next to Tweets mentioning your hashtag to add it to your FlipBoard.

Tap on add

Automating the sharing and collating process

IFTTT is a service that allows you to automate tasks.   It is pronounced like ‘gift’ without the ‘g’ and stands for “If this then that’.

What you do is set up different IFTTT recipes for the task you want to automate and each recipe is a combination of a trigger and an action.

For example, I can easily share posts I star in Google Reader with my Twitter followers automatically using IFTTT.

It sounds more confusing that it is!

About IFTTT

 

Here’s how to automate sharing posts from Google reader using IFTTT:

1.  Sign up for IFTTT account.

2.  Go to Browse Recipes and find the recipe you want to use.

Find the recipe

4.  Click on the Arrow next to the recipe you want to use.

Click on Arrow

5. Click on Activate under each channel first.

Follow the instructions to authorize IFTTT to access the channels. In my example. I have to allow it to access Google reader and Twitter.  It’ll ask you to log into your account and then Authorize access.

Authorize the channels

6.  Scroll down and review what the Recipe does then click Use Recipe (if you want to use).

Click on Use Recipe

You can customise the recipe to suit your needs.  For example, I changed the order to tweet Item title and then Item URL.

Changing a recipe

Some followers assume I’m sharing a post I’ve read.  I could add this customisation:

Customising a recipe

7.  Now when I star a post in Google Reader it is shared automatically by my Twitter account.

Click on Star

Here’s an example of a tweet shared this way:

8.  IFTTT doesn’t process your actions immediately.

  • It’ll tweet links to starred Google Reader posts several minutes after I’ve starred them.
  • If you want to check if your recipe is working properly just click Check Now and it’ll immediately trigger the action.

Check now

9.  You can disable a recipe at any time by clicking on Turn off.

How you can use IFTTT

You can use IFTTT to automate a wide range of processes.   Check out IFTTT recipes others use for ideas and think about the tools you use regularly to see if there are recipes that will speed up the process.

These are the IFTTT recipes I use are:

  1. Tweet starred Google Reader post recipe - good for sharing posts you recommend to others on Twitter.
  2. Send Favorite Tweets to Evernote (workaround to Twitter trigger ending) recipe – great for collation links from Twitter to Evernote to refer to later.
  3. Tweet my blog post – good for automating the tweet of blog posts.

Learn to let go

When you’re new you think you need to know everything and keep up with it all right now!  You don’t!

Learn how to interact more time effectively reading blog posts. using Google+, Twitter hashtags and then focus on learning what you want to learn.  You don’t need to follow every link, think about every conversation.  You can always come back or ask others to help fill in the information you missed.

What are your tips?

These are my tips and what speeds up the process for me.   There are lots of different ways you can work smarter rather than harder.

What has helped you?  What advice would you give others?  Is there anything I’ve included that you want covered in more detail?

February 17, 2010
by Sue Waters
14 Comments

Free to good home!

Image by a href=Any takers?

I’ve had enough of the work involved with dealing with spammers on Ning sites.

So decided to reduce the workload by getting rid of eTools and Tips for Educators.

It’s a cool name and URL – http://etools.ning.com/

If Ning is like blog sites once a URL has been deleted no-one including the original user can create the site again with that URL.

Let me know if you would like to take it over (and use how you want) otherwise I’m deleting in 48 hours.

PS  Unlike my husband who I’ve tried to give away (occasionally) it doesn’t come with an inbuilt snore 8-)

Image by Mubblegum licensed under Creative Commons ShareAlike

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!

January 22, 2010
by Sue Waters
9 Comments

Always Push Those Boundaries

It’s amazing how a blast from the past can be such a powerful reminder!

I created Animoto video below over 2 years ago!

It was unusual because as I said in the description:

Had to push the boundaries of using Animoto by adding words and voice. Not because it was a good idea, it probably wasn’t, but the challenge was there so had to try!

Today David N. left me the timely reminder in a comment:

Animoto comment

Happy to say I continue to push those boundaries and are learning new things every day.

My motto–

  • The only bad ideas are never trying or giving up too quickly

Since Animoto allows you to upload your own music I quickly recorded some audio (using Audacity) and uploaded it to put with my video.

And here’s the video for a chuckle

Oops and apologies in advance as I may have said bad words like ‘this might be crap’ when talking.

Create your own video slideshow at animoto.com.

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!

November 30, 2009
by Sue Waters
14 Comments

Using Public Google Waves For Personal Learning

There’s always a shiny new toy– and with it the stampede to use.

Yes that was also me once too :(  Nowadays I’ve learnt very slow, steady saves time and my sanity.

So I’m incredibly proud of the fact that I’ve never watched ANY Google Wave videos, read ANY tutorials and avoided every invite until I stumbled across a reason for investigating.

My motivation was I discovered you can set up public waves that any one can join.

I decided this was a good way for me and other educators to learn how to use Wave, by working together with each other, while also seeing how Wave might be used for personal learning (and with student).

Joining a Public Wave

We’ve called our public wave eduwave.

Joining  it is as easy as:

  1. Search for Eduwave by typing with:public Eduwave into search and then hit Enter.Searching for a public wave
  2. Now all you need to do is click Follow once you’ve found Eduwave to start following it. Following a wave
  3. Feel free to add your own replies to the wave, test different features and send me a tweet (@suewaters) if you want me to log in and join you.

Off course I’m proud of the fact that my friends taught me quickly how to use Wave.

Creating a Public Wave

Big thanks to Rob Wall for quickly locating the information I needed to create the public wave.

All you need to do is:

  1. Add public@a.gwave.com to your contacts lists by clicking on Add new Contact, enter the email address public@a.gwave.com and then click Enter Adding public@a.gwave.com
  2. It should add Public to your Contact list
  3. Now hover your mouse over Public’s avatar and select new wave Creating a public wave

Now anyone in Google Wave can search and add themselves to your public wave.

FINAL THOUGHTS

Please share your thoughts on Google Wave.

Your like(s), Dislike(s), What’s cool? Your tips… and links to any tutorials that I should have read 8-)

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!

October 4, 2009
by Sue Waters
19 Comments

A Year Later And Are We Using Different Tools To Connect To Our PLNs?

One year ago I asked my network to complete a survey on Personal Learning Network.

The survey was used in a series of presentations and to build my PLN Yourself website.

Being a year later I’m wondering how much has changes?  Are we using different tools to connect?  Are the tools we would recommend to new people different?

Can you help in the following ways:

  1. Can you please complete my new Personal Learning Networks Survey?
    • There are only 2 questions
  2. Can you promote my Personal Learning Networks Survey to your network using a range of tools?
    • For example blog post, twitter, plurk, Facebook so responses aren’t biased by promotion by one tool or one individual

If you do promote this survey can you please link to this post by creating a pingback and/or leaving a comment?  So I have a record of all the different ways in which this latest survey has been promoted?

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!

September 29, 2009
by Sue Waters
45 Comments

What Are Your Thoughts on Educational Blogging?

I’m doing a presentation next week for Alec Couros‘ s EC&I 831: Social Media & Open Education course and as part of it I’ve need to organise some required reading one week prior to the presentation.

I’ve been asked to focus on educational blogging and building personal learning networks so I’m hoping you can help as I want to:

  1. Demonstrate how conversations in blog comments provides greater knowledge gain for all involved, because each individual sees a different perspective of the task – giving everyone greater “food for thought!”
  2. Model personal learning networks in action!

About The course

EC&I 831: Social Media & Open Education course is an open access graduate course from the Faculty of Education, University of Regina for both registered and non-registered students.

Participants are all teachers, or principals, and most are new to using social media.

Can you share your thoughts on the following:

  1. What are the benefits of blogging with students and/or yourself?
  2. What are some of the challenge of student blogging and how do you avoid them?
  3. Can you recommend any ‘must read’ articles on student blogging?
  4. What questions would you most like me to answer if you attended a presentation by me on educational blogging and building personal learning networks?

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!

June 21, 2009
by Sue Waters
14 Comments

Baiting the Digital Hook to Build A Professional Learning Community!

Last week I was invited to present on PLNs (personal learning networks) as part of Getting Connected 09 for The Australian Flexible Learning Frameworks.

As the conference targeted the VET sector I decided to take a different PLN approach and share how social networking tools can create communities of professionals, and students, that help each other.

Skills level of participants

Participants were surveyed near the start of the session to help guide how little/much information on each aspect need to be explained. The results are shown in the table below (Yes= has their own or uses with their students; No = doesn’t have own or use with students; No response = they didn’t respond to the question).

Value of Creating Communities

The message for creating professional learning communities using social networking tools was similar to PLNs. Our daily face-to-face interactions offer limited opportunities for:

  • Asking our work colleagues/students questions
  • Reflecting on ideas with each other
  • Effectively sharing information

Social networking tools provide the ability to easily connect ourselves, our students, with educators in the same/similar fields, and people from industry to form a global community. This greatly increases opportunities to receive assistance and provide assistance.

The main difference to a PLN is technology skills of individuals you may want as part of your professional learning community are often (very) low. This means you need to use a range of tools including ones they are more likely to feel comfortable using.

To stay sane remember:

  • Not everyone will share your excitement (and it is unrealistic to think they will)
  • Let them choose whether or not they join
  • Don’t be offended if you can’t encourage everyone to participate
  • Be grateful for those that do participate
  • It takes time!

During the session I discussed the main tools I use for aquaculture industry to highlight their benefits and how it can be done.

Facebook

In terms of aquaculture Facebook is used mainly with my students (but I do have some work colleagues in my account). My students are given the option to add me to their Facebook account knowing that they can email me, use the chat or leave comments on my wall.

Years ago I used to give students my email address and never get got any emails. With Facebook student regularly contact me to help with both my work and other courses. Many continue to remain in contact when they leave.

Ning

Our AquaEd Ning community to connect educators, industry and my students together (consists of members from within Australia and oversees).

Benefits of Ning are ability to have forums, upload photos, upload/share videos and easily email all members etc.

For me this Ning community meant I was about to source training material and images to use for an aquaculture elearning unit. I couldn’t have sourced this material as well (or as quickly) using traditional methods.

My students, and other community members, are using this Ning to share what they are doing and ask others questions.

Ning challenges are you need to be prepared to facilitate and encourage conversation. The more people you can encourage to help you facilitate the more likely it will grow. As a Ning owner you need to closely monitor all new members (using RSS) due to spammers.

Twitter

Never thought it would happen but have people from aquaculture joining my twitter account. Which has been excellent because they also then join AquaEd Ning.

As these people are already into social networking they add value to your community because they aren’t reluctant users.

FINAL THOUGHTS

This session was recorded and you can watch it here!

My advice for building a community remains the same as for a PLN — your first step is to start using these tools for your own learning then start thinking how you can connect with members from your industry. Check out my PLN Yourself website to get started!

Meanwhile for those that have created professional learning communities — please share your stories. What has worked well? What aspects have caused problems?

And if you’re enjoying this blog, please consider Subscribing for free!